In an effort to further increase scrutiny on technology-related spending, the California Technology Agency (Technology Agency) today announced Information Technology Policy Letter (ITPL) 11-01 requiring Department Directors to approve all IT Acquisition Plans (ITAP) submitted to the Technology Agency. The policy, which previously allowed such requests to be approved by the department Chief Information Officer, requires executive branch agencies to submit ITAPs on:

* IT Services and Consulting acquisitions with an aggregate value of $100,000 or greater;

* Public Safety Communications Goods and Services acquisitions (e.g., purchase, lease, maintenance, support, and related services) with an aggregate value of $25,000 or greater;

* Hardware acquisitions (e.g., purchase, lease, maintenance, support, and related services) with an aggregate value of $20,000 or greater;

* Telecommunications Goods and Services (e.g., purchase, lease, maintenance, support, and related services) with an aggregate value of $5,000 or greater (services purchased through CALNET 2 are exempt from this Policy Letter); and

* Software acquisitions (e.g., Software-as-a-Service, purchase, lease, maintenance, support, and related services) with an aggregate value of $5,000 or greater.

ITAPs currently under review at the Technology Agency Program Management Office (PMO) will be returned unapproved to the submitting department for certification. Departments are being requested to review their ITAPs to validate and confirm the necessity of the requested acquisitions before submitting Department Director-certified ITAPs to the Technology Agency.

In July 2009, the agency issued ITPL 09-06 requiring agencies to submit ITAPs to provide a way for the Technology Agency to review and coordinate technology acquisitions, to reduce overlap and achieve efficiencies.

When the Technology Agency was established in January 2008 as the Office of the State Chief Information Officer (OCIO), it was the intent of the Legislature and Governor to create an agency that, among other things, establishes policies and standards to ensure that state information technology systems run effectively. Through changes to the State Administrative Manual and the Statewide Information Management Manual, the Technology Agency creates statewide policy for the Executive Branch to ensure coordination as the agency works to oversee IT activities with a common direction and vision.

Effective January 1, 2011, the OCIO was renamed the California Technology Agency.

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